Top Medical Searches

Current Medical News

U.S. judge releases dying lawyer convicted of aiding terrorism

A police officer puts his arm around disbarred lawyer Lynne Stewart as she arrives at federal court to begin her prison sentence in New YorkBy Jonathan Stempel NEW YORK (Reuters) – A federal judge on Tuesday granted Lynne Stewart, a former defense lawyer convicted of aiding terrorism, a "compassionate" release from prison because she is dying of cancer. Stewart, 74, has been serving a 10-year sentence over her 2005 conviction for helping a client, blind Egyptian cleric Sheikh Omar Abdel-Rahman, smuggle messages from prison to Egypt's Islamic Group, which the U.S. government had listed as a terrorist organization. Earlier this year, Stewart asked U.S. District Judge John Koeltl in Manhattan for early release under a Federal Bureau of Prisons program for terminally ill inmates. Koeltl, who in August had denied the request, noting that the Bureau of Prisons had not supported it, on Tuesday granted the request, following a recommendation for release from the Bureau of Prisons and the U.S. attorney in Manhattan.

Read More..

December 31st, 2013

School of Seven Bells co-founder Curtis dies

FILE - In this Nov. 13, 2006 file photo, Benjamin Curtis with the band Secret Machines performs at a launch party for Microsoft's new music player Zune at Westlake Park in downtown Seattle. Curtis, guitarist and co-founder of the popular indie-rock band School of Seven Bells, has died on Dec. 29, 2013, of cancer. He was 35. (AP Photo/John Froschauer, File)DALLAS (AP) — Benjamin Curtis, guitarist and co-founder of the popular indie-rock band School of Seven Bells, has died of cancer. He was 35.

Read More..

December 31st, 2013

Vitamin E may slow Alzheimer’s disease progression

FILE - In this Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility in Washington, puts her hand on the arm of a resident. In a study published by the Journal of the American Medical Association on Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2013, researchers report that vitamin E might slow the progression of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. The study of more than 600 older veterans, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, shows high doses of the vitamin delayed the decline in daily living skills, such as making meals, getting dressed and holding a conversation, by about six months over a two-year period. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)Researchers say vitamin E might slow the progression of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease — the first time any treatment has been shown to alter the course of dementia at that stage.

Read More..

December 31st, 2013

Vitamin E may slow early Alzheimer’s decline: study

By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Taking vitamin E during the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease slowed declines in patients’ ability to perform basic tasks by about six months in a new study. “It will be very interesting to see to what extent this will change practice,” Dr. Maurice Dysken said. Researchers have studied vitamin E for possible benefits in slowing the progression of Alzheimer’s, but those studies have yielded mixed results. For example, the researchers write in JAMA, past research has found the vitamin slowed disease progression in people with moderately severe Alzheimer’s. But the vitamin was not effective at slowing the transition to Alzheimer’s for people with so-called mild cognitive impairment, which typically precedes Alzheimer’s. To see whether vitamin E – or a combination of the vitamin with memantine, a drug approved in the U.S. to treat Alzheimer’s – would slow the rate of decline in people with mild to moderate forms of the disease, the researchers recruited 613 trial participants from 14 Veterans Affairs medical centers. Read More..

December 31st, 2013

Abbas threatens legal, diplomatic action against Israel settlements

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas greets released Palestinian prisoners at his headquarters in the West Bank city of Ramallah on December 31, 2013Ramallah (Palestinian Territories) (AFP) – Palestinian president Mahmud Abbas on Tuesday threatened diplomatic and legal action against the "cancer" of Israeli settlement building, a day before US Secretary of State John Kerry visits. "We will not remain patient as the settlement cancer spreads, especially in (east) Jerusalem, and we will use our right as a UN observer state by taking political, diplomatic and legal action to stop it," he said during a speech in Ramallah to mark the 49th anniversary of the founding of the Fatah party. "We have entered negotiations amid Israeli escalation on all fronts — the Israeli army steps up its hostilities against the Gaza Strip and in the West Bank, leading to the killing of dozens of citizens in the last few months," said Abbas. Kerry's myriad obstacles to an agreement in the US-brokered talks which began in July include the issue of settlements and Israel's insistence on maintaining a military presence in the Jordan Valley under any peace agreement.

Read More..

December 31st, 2013
Copyright 2008 © Drugs and Diseases. Developed by Axilosoft
Home | About Us | Privacy Policy | Contact Us